Thursday, May 1st 2008

12:00 AM

2008 Lost Mentions & Interesting Read......

==================================================

Thanx to my friend "NYCDreamin'" for finding these:


Title: Glam! - Bowie, Bolan and the Glitter Rock Revolution
Author: Barry Hoskyns
Published: 1998 by Pocket Books
Magic Tramps info to be found on pages: 70-71, 76, 98
 
"To a fan like Jerry Nolan, who would soon be drumming in Wayne County's band Queen Elizabeth, the Dolls were simply bringing back the three minute song in an era of ten-minute drum solos. After a couple of scuzzy midtown gigs in the early spring of 1972, [David] Johansen got word from Max's regular (and Warhol veteran) Eric Emerson that there was a new place to play downtown. Emerson had formed his own band, the Magic Tramps, and was holding down a regular night at the Mercer Arts Center, a theatre arts complex which had been renovated in a style that coupled Clockwork Orange decor with Victorian chandeliers. 'Eric was out of his mind, but he was a great guy,' says Johansen. 'He had a thing going in the video room, the Kitchen, where Nam June Paik would put on his videos of John Giorno taking a nap or whatever, and [Eric] said 'Why don't you come down and play with me?' So we went down and opened for him, and Al Lewis - who booked the place and was this old-time showbiz guy with a suit and toupee - comes running up to me and says 'Play again! Play again!' After the show he said he wanted to give us our own room, on Tuesdays, at midnight."
 
 
"...and there were a lot of loft gatherings, people trying to recreate the Factory feel. Sometimes there'd be partis, and the Dolls would start playing, or the Magic tramps would start playing. Eric was astounding. He could leap through the air like Rudolf Nureyev. He would wear Iggy Pop costumes but added sparkles and glitter to his costumes. Iggy could contort, but Eric could fly through the air like a fucking bird."                         - Bebe Buell
 
 
"Watching the Dolls play the Mercer in February 1973 - on a Valentine's day bill with the Magic Tramps, Queen Elizabeth, et al. - the English writer Miles was astonished by the spectacle of a 'new wave of New York groups who've picked up on Bolan, Slade, Elton and Bowie in a big way and combined them with such historical figures as the Fugs, the early Mothers, and Lou Reed', and observed that 'LA soft-rock has been stomped on by glittering, lurid, day-glo platform shoes.' "
 
 
"But David Bowie, one of glam's chief architects, was fast outgrowing the genere, creating in [the] Diamond Dogs [LP], what Charles Shaar Murray described as 'the final nightmare of the glittering apocalypse'. Produced by Tony Visconti and released in April 1974, the album was Ziggy Stardust crossed with Burrough's Wild Boys, an overwraught Orwellian song cycle set in a dystopian Manhattan of the future and writter in a state of coked-out paranoia. 'Most of the songs are obscure tangles of perversion, degredation, fear and self pity,' wrote Eric Emerson of the Magic Tramps in a Rolling Stone review. 'Are they masturbatory fantasies, guilt ridden projections, terrified premonitions, aor is it all Alice Cooper exploitation?' A quarter century later, it's still hard to answer that question."


 
Quotes from:
"Glam! Bowie, Bolan and the Glitter Rock Revolution"
by Barney Hoskyns (199
 
p.71 (Bebe Buell)
"...there were a lot of loft gatherings, people trying to recreate the Factory feel. Sometimes there'd be parties, and the Dolls would start playing, or the Magic Tramps would start playing. Eric was astounding. He could leap through the air like Rudolph Nureyev. He would wear Iggy Pop costumes but added sparkles and glitter to his costumes. Iggy could contort, but Eric could fly through the air like a fucking bird."
 
p. 76
Watching the Dolls play the Mercer in February 1973 - on a Valentines Day bill with the Magic Tramps, Queen Elizabeth, et al - the English writer [Sylvia] Miles was astonished by the spectacle of a 'new wave of New York Groups who've picked up on Bolan, Slade, Elton and Bowie in a big way and combined them with such historical figures as the Fugs, the early Mothers and Lou Reed', and observed that 'LA soft rock has been stomped on by glittering, lurid, day-glo platform shoes.'
 
p. 98 (Includes a quote from Eric Emerson)
...David Bowie, one of glam's chief architects, was fast outgrowing the genere, creating in [his] "Diamond Dogs" [LP]what Charles Shaar Murray described as 'the final nightmare of the glitter apocalypse.' Produced by Tony Visconti and released in April 1974, the album was "Ziggy Stardust" crossed with William Burroughs' "Wild Boys", an Orwellian song cycle set in a dystopian Manhattan of the future and written in a state of coked-out paranoia. 'Most of the songs are obscure tangles of perversion, degredation, fear and self-pity,' wrote Eric Emerson of the Magic Tramps in a Rolling Stone [magazine] review [of the album]. 'Are they masturbatory fantasies, guilt-ridden projections, terrified premonitions, or is it all Alice Cooper exploitation?' A quarter century later, it's still hard to answer that question.



 

1 Comment(s).

There are no comments to this entry.